New MRI technique finds Multiple Sclerosis Quicker

In England, a new way of using MRI scanners to look for evidence of multiple sclerosis in the brain has been successfully tested by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust according to Medicial News Today.

 

The study published In the Multiple Sclerosis Journal said that researchers used a clinical MRI scanner, similar to the type of most  neuroscience centers have, to carry out a special type of scan called a T2-weighted imaging process which is able to reveal lesions in the brain’s white matter that are centred on a vein – a known indicator of MS.

 

 

Dr. Nikos Evangelou, who led the study, said, “…we wanted to find out whether a single brain scan in an NHS hospital scanner could also be effective in distinguishing between patients known to have MS and patients known to have non-MS brain lesions. We are excited to reveal that our results show that clinical application of this technique could supplement existing diagnostic methods for MS.”

 

The new study is significant because currently among patients referred to MS treatment centers with suspected MS, fewer than 50 per cent are found to have it. This shows that diagnosing MS in a significant minority of cases can be challenging.

 

The research team has been working to bring their study to the United States, and we can’t wait to see how it progresses. It’s so awesome seeing MRI technology being used in new ways to solve issues in the medical world!

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